What Every Woman Wishes Her Man Would Know!

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Samuel López De Victoria, Ph.D.

Samuel Lopez De Victoria, Ph.D. is a psychotherapist in private practice. He has taught as a psychology professor at the Miami Dade College in Miami, FL., the University of the Rockies in Colorado Springs, CO, and currently for the Ashford University in Clinton, IA. He can be contacted through his web site at www.DrSam.tv

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APA Reference

López De Victoria, S. (2020). What Every Woman Wishes Her Man Would Know!. Psych Central.
Retrieved on November 22, 2020, from https://psychcentral.com/blog/what-every-woman-wishes-her-man-would-know/

Scientifically Reviewed
Last updated: 20 Nov 2020 (Originally: 20 Nov 2020)

Last reviewed: By a member of our scientific advisory board on 20 Nov 2020
Published on Psych Central.com. All rights reserved.

 

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Hypertension, health inequities, and implications for COVID-19 – Harvard Health Blog

The COVID-19 pandemic has led many people to forego follow-up and treatment of chronic health conditions such as hypertension (high blood pressure). It is now quite evident that people with hypertension are also more likely to develop severe complications from the coronavirus. In the US, African Americans and other racial and ethnic minorities, including Hispanics and Native Americans, are more likely to have hypertension, and consequently have been disproportionately affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.

What is the link between high blood pressure and heart disease?

Hypertension is the most common modifiable risk factor for major cardiovascular events including death, heart attack, and stroke, and it plays a major role in the development of heart failure, kidney disease, and dementia. Over the past few decades, major efforts have been launched to increase awareness and treatment of hypertension.

Hypertension increases stress on the heart and arteries as well as on other organs including the brain and kidneys. Over time, this stress results in changes that negatively impact the body’s ability to function. To reduce these negative effects on the heart, medications are typically prescribed when blood pressure goes above 140/90 for those without significant cardiovascular risk, or above 130/80 in people with known coronary artery disease or other coexisting diseases like diabetes.

Certain groups are disproportionately affected by hypertension and severe COVID-19

According to a recent study published in JAMA, the proportion of study participants with controlled blood pressure (defined as < 140/90 mm Hg) initially increased and then held steady at 54% from 1999 to 2014. However, the proportion of patients with controlled blood pressures subsequently declined significantly, to 44% by 2018. Further, certain subgroups appeared to have a disproportionately higher rate of uncontrolled hypertension: African Americans, uninsured patients, and patients with Medicaid, as well as younger patients (ages 18

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