Newsweek Well being

At the Y, we consider well being and fitness means taking good care of the entire you, and we know that even small adjustments can make a giant difference. The 2-yr-previous, Los-Angeles-primarily based company is the brainchild of business and engineering majors on the University of Michigan, who regarded on the health tracker area because the Nike+ FuelBand emerged and saw an enormous alternative to grasp what individuals are doing contextually,” co-founder and chief working officer Grant Hughes tells Yahoo Health. Not like some other health trackers in the marketplace, FocusMotion’s platform has the flexibility to acknowledge a pose and how long it is held. We wished to give individuals ‘credit’ each time they go to a yoga class,” for instance, Hughes explains.

Affect Sports activities and Health is a full-service fitness center situated in Abilene, Kansas. Our purpose is so that you can expertise an overall feeling of properly being and good health. We serve people of all ages and fitness ranges and what we offer is unique for a neighborhood of our size. A variety of providers can be found for members and non-members. Men Health Our skilled staff, which includes nationally certified private trainers, group fitness instructors, and massage therapist, will provide help to reach your objectives the best manner and make you feel at dwelling.

One of the key points is lengthy-term imaginative and prescient inside Apple’s well being group. Four individuals advised CNBC that some employees feel the company could be taking on more ambitious projects and doing more in health. As an alternative, its services are mostly confined to wellness and prevention. The individuals noted these differences of opinion have flared up between the completely different teams. Benefit from our gym facilities, group health lessons and personal training choices whilst visiting Millbrook. Access to …

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Dealing With Anxiety in the Time of COVID-19

Now that we’re in the middle of a pandemic, more people than ever are experiencing anxiety, especially those who struggled with mental health issues before COVID-19. And to make things even worse, many of our coping mechanisms, like going to the gym or hanging out with friends, have been taken away.

In today’s show, our host, Gabe Howard, talks with Dr. Jasleen Chhatwal, who helps explain why so many people are having anxiety symptoms and what we can do about it.

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Jasleen Chhatwal, MD, is Chief Medical Officer and Director of the Mood Disorders Program at Sierra Tucson, a premier residential behavioral health treatment center. Dr. Chhatwal also serves as Assistant Professor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. Board certified in Psychiatry and Integrative Medicine, she is well versed in psychodynamic psychotherapy, cognitive behavior therapy, psychopharmacology, neuromodulation including ECT & rTMS, and various emerging modalities. 

Dr. Chhatwal is active in the mental health community, advocating for her patients, colleagues, and profession through elected positions with the Arizona Psychiatric Society and American Psychiatric Association. 

 


About The Psych Central Podcast Host

Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from the author. To learn more about Gabe, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.


Computer Generated Transcript for ‘Managing Anxiety’
 Episode

Editor’s Note: Please be mindful that this transcript has been computer generated and therefore may contain inaccuracies and grammar errors. Thank you.

Announcer: You’re listening to the Psych Central Podcast, where guest experts in the

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Discrimination, high blood pressure, and health disparities in African Americans – Harvard Health Blog

Over the past few months, we have all seen the results of significant disruption to daily life due to the COVID-19 pandemic, high levels of unemployment, and civil unrest driven by chronic racial injustice. These overlapping waves of societal insult have begun to bring necessary attention to the importance of health care disparities in the United States.

Direct links between stress, discrimination, racial injustice, and health outcomes occurring over one’s lifespan have not been well studied. But a recently published article in the journal Hypertension has looked at the connection between discrimination and increased risk of hypertension (high blood pressure) in African Americans.

Study links discrimination and hypertension in African Americans

It has been well established that African Americans have a higher risk of hypertension compared with other racial or ethnic groups in the United States. The authors of the Hypertension study hypothesized that a possible explanation for this disparity is discrimination.

The researchers reviewed data on 1,845 African Americans, ages 21 to 85, enrolled in the Jackson Heart Study, an ongoing longitudinal study of cardiovascular disease risk factors among African Americans in Jackson, Mississippi. Participants in the Hypertension analysis did not have hypertension during their first study visits in 2000 through 2004. Their blood pressure was checked, and they were asked about blood pressure medications, during two follow-up study visits from 2005 to 2008 and from 2009 to 2013. They also self-reported their discrimination experiences through in-home interviews, questionnaires, and in-clinic examinations.

The study found that higher stress from lifetime discrimination was associated with higher risk of hypertension, but the association was weaker when hypertension risk factors such as body mass index, smoking, alcohol, diet, and physical activity were taken into consideration. The study authors concluded that lifetime discrimination may increase the risk of hypertension in African Americans.

Discrimination

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