Religion’s Role in Mental Illness Treatment

Tune in for a deep discussion on religion and severe mental illness, including Rachel’s 3-day exorcism experience at age 17.

(Transcript Available Below)


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Guest Information for ‘Rachel Star Wither- Religion Mental Illness’ Podcast Episode

Rachel Star Withers is the host of the Inside Schizophrenia podcast, and a mental health advocate who lives with schizophrenia. She creates comedic and mental health videos and has appeared in numerous TV shows.

 

 

 

 

About The Not Crazy Podcast Hosts

Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from Gabe Howard. To learn more, please visit his website, gabehoward.com.

 

 

 

 

Lisa is the producer of the Psych Central podcast, Not Crazy. She is the recipient of The National Alliance on Mental Illness’s “Above and Beyond” award, has worked extensively with the Ohio Peer Supporter Certification program, and is a workplace suicide prevention trainer. Lisa has battled depression her entire life and has worked alongside Gabe in mental health advocacy for over a decade. She lives in Columbus, Ohio, with her husband; enjoys international travel; and orders 12 pairs of shoes online, picks the best one, and sends the other 11 back.

 

 


Computer Generated Transcript for “Rachel Star Wither- Religion Mental IllnessEpisode

Editor’s NotePlease be mindful that this transcript has been computer generated and therefore may contain inaccuracies and grammar errors. Thank you.

Lisa: You’re listening to Not Crazy, a psych central podcast hosted by my ex-husband, who has bipolar disorder. Together, we created the mental health podcast for people who hate mental health podcasts.

Gabe: Hello,

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The first thing that came to mind when I heard about COVID restrictions and mitigation strategies was how exceptionally dangerous this time could be for women living with abusive partners. “Self-isolate,” “stay at home,” “practice social distancing,” and “recession” are all words likely to be terrifying to many women who are living with intimate partner violence (IPV). The lives of these women are often filled with fear and danger under normal circumstances, but during this new normal of the global pandemic, the lives of these very often “invisible victims” are at an increased risk for more violence — and even murder.

Prior to the COVID pandemic, epidemiological estimates showed that nearly one in three women experience IPV, and approximately one in four women experience severe IPV. Other data show that nearly half of all female homicides are from a current or past male intimate partner. Although these numbers are already unacceptably high, historical data show increases in rates of IPV during pandemics and times of economic crisis. Other data show that domestic violence tends to increase when families spend more time together, such as over the holidays.

COVID restrictions have caused a spike in IPV

Unfortunately, the realities of COVID-19 and its restrictions have indeed caused a perfect storm for women experiencing IPV. First, there have been numerous media reports indicating huge spikes in calls to IPV hotlines, sometimes doubling and tripling the typical number of requests for help, after stay-in-place orders were mandated.

Second, reports have indicated frightening increases in femicide from IPV. The UK has reported femicide rates higher than they have been in the past 11 years, double the average for a 21-day period. Mexico has reported an 8% increase in femicides, with nearly 1,000 women murdered in the first three months of the year. These

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